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JMadisonStampJames Madison may have provided the fewest biographies for me to read of any of the first four presidents, but he certainly offered no less mystery. After four books and almost two thousand pages, I still find Madison more abstruse and enigmatic than any of the presidents before him.  But though he is the least well-known among this group of presidents, he was in no way the least accomplished.

Madison was the Author, co-author and/or primary “champion” of the US Constitution, the Bill of Rights, The Federalist Papers, the Virginia Declaration of Rights (the section on religious freedom) and the Virginia Resolution of 1798.  He was the Sponsor of Jefferson’s Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, the second Rector (President) of the University of Virginia, the founder of one of the earliest political parties and Secretary of State.  Oh, and he was a two-term President.

Madison was also involved in one of the most unique, powerful, extraordinary and remarkably interesting friendships and political alliances in the history of the United States, with Thomas Jefferson.

There is a great deal to be learned about, and from, James Madison but one thing seems inevitable: we will never “get to know” him as we can George Washington (about whom so much has been written), or John Adams or Thomas Jefferson (many of their personal letters survive, including some which are almost self-diagnostic in nature).  Nonetheless, by virtue of his enormous body of political work we are able to learn a great deal about the “public” face of Madison.

JMMkr* Every early president seems to have a timeless “go to” biography by a truly dedicated author.  In the case of James Madison, that biography is Ralph Ketcham’s “James Madison: A Biography” published in 1971.  Authoritative biographies (particularly those several decades old) are often less readable and enjoyable than those more recently drafted; Ketcham’s biography is no exception.

But after reading more recent books on Madison, it is clear that Ketcham’s scholarship has endured well.  I would have preferred more insight from Ketcham into the “personal” Madison, but no other author was able to provide a significantly more penetrating look into his psyche. Overall, a solid if not exceptional biography. (Full review here)

* “Madison and Jefferson” by Andrew Burstein and Nancy Isenberg seemed to promise the best amalgamation of our third and fourth presidents, including unique insights into their near lifelong partnership with each other. While the concept is fantastic, the execution is not as perfect as I would have liked. This dual biography does manage to cover a great deal of ground, but at an uneven pace; certain moments are rushed past while others seem to linger past their prime.

And as good as this book is, it does not provide all the extra insight into the Madison/Jefferson relationship it seems to promise. Other biographies of Jefferson and Madison provide similar depth. In the end, this is an entertaining and often revealing look at two of history’s most important political figures…but readers will still do well to tackle separate comprehensive biographies of each of these former presidents. (Full review here)

* “James Madison” by Richard Brookhiser is the shortest of the Madison biographies I read by a wide margin. As a result, this book lacks depth the others provide and, like the other Madison biographies, also fails to fully animate him as a person. As a book to read by the beach or pool, this is the best of the group. What it lacks in thorough treatment and deep analysis it makes up for by filtering out all but the most essential information. In that respect, this book has the most impact-per-page of almost any presidential biography I have read to-date. (Full review here)

* The last biography I read of our fourth president was “James Madison and the Making of America” by Kevin Gutzman. Although it is an excellent book in many ways, I like it less as a biography of James Madison (which it is probably not intended to be) and more as an eyewitness account of the birth of the Constitution. The hint is in the title; it took me awhile to figure it out. The two-thirds of the text devoted the drafting, passage and ratification of the Constitution are uniquely insightful and interesting. But the one-third of the book focused on all other aspects of Madison’s life (for example, his presidency) proves a rushed blur by comparison. (Full review here)

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Best Biography of Madison: “James Madison: A Biography” by Ralph Ketcham

Best “Beach Book” on Madison: “James Madison” by Richard Brookhiser

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